Battle For The Net

If you woke up tomorrow, and your internet looked like this, what would you do? Imagine all your favorite websites taking forever to load, while you get annoying notifications from your ISP suggesting you switch to one of their approved “Fast Lane” sites.Think about what we would lose: all the weird, alternative, interesting, and enlightening stuff that makes the Internet so much cooler than mainstream Cable TV. What if the only news sites you could reliably connect to were the ones that had deals with companies like Comcast and Verizon?On September 10th, just a few days before the FCC’s comment deadline, public interest organizations are issuing an open, international call for websites and internet users to unite for an “Internet Slowdown” to show the world what the web would be like if Team Cable gets their way and trashes net neutrality. Net neutrality is hard to explain, so our hope is that this action will help SHOW the world what’s really at stake if we lose the open Internet.If you’ve got a website, blog or tumblr, get the code to join the #InternetSlowdown here: https://battleforthenet.com/sept10thEveryone else, here’s a quick list of things you can do to help spread the word about the slowdown: http://tumblr.fightforthefuture.org/post/96020972118/be-a-part-of-the-great-internet-slowdown Get creative! Don’t let us tell you what to do. See you on the net September 10th!

via Battle For The Net.

10 Things I Learned At WordCamp This Summer

I’m speaking at the Metro Detroit WordPress Meetup, Sept 21, 2014, and shockingly, I’ve got my slide deck ready well before time!

This slideshow could not be started. Try refreshing the page or viewing it in another browser.

Links for more info:.

  1. Brute Protect:  https://bruteprotect.com/
  2. WP Multi-Networks Plugin:  https://wordpress.org/plugins/wp-multi-network/
  3. Future of WordPress Updates:  http://wordpress.tv/2014/06/30/andrew-nacin-advanced-topics-in-wordpress-development/
  4. P2 theme:  http://wordpress.org/themes/p2
  5. API-JSON:  http://wptavern.com/json-rest-api-slated-for-wordpress-4-1-release
  6. Desktop Server from ServerPress:  http://serverpress.com/products/desktopserver/
  7. WordPress Philosophy:  http://wordpress.org/about/philosophy/
  8. ChalkPress:
  9. Making Presentations in/with WordPress:  Other plugin and theme presentation options include:
    1. Jetpack Presentation Shortcode http://en.support.wordpress.com/presentations/
      1. You can see a demo of the Jetpack Presentation Shortcode, including underlying code, at http://bluelotusworks.com/organizing-the-wordpress-backoffice-eight-plugins-that-help/
    2. 3D Presentation http://wordpress.org/plugins/3d-presentation/
    3. HTML5 Slideshow Presentations http://wordpress.org/plugins/html5-slideshow-presentations/
    4. Post Presentations http://wordpress.org/plugins/post-presentations/

Bonus:  Year Without Pants

CAA May 2014 – Economics of Intergenerational Transfers

I’m speaking to today to the Council on Action for Aging at Henry Ford Senior Living Village. I’ll be talking about the economics of intergenerational transfers and how, contrary to the views put forth in much of the news media, the Social Security system is actually doing quite well and “will be there” when even the youngest among us retire.

HLC 2014 – Effective Strategic Planning for Disruptive and Challenging Times

Higher education is facing some very interesting time – challenging and disruptive times. Although virtually all colleges and universities engage in strategic planning, the way they approach strategic planning is ill-suited to the when markets, stakeholders, students, technology, and regulations are changing as rapidly and predictably as they are now. In effect, there’s too much plan and not enough strategy in higher education strategic planning.

My presentation today to HLC 2014 conference (embedded) and more summary below the fold. Continue reading

There’s No “Skills Shortage”

There are plenty of reasons why higher education in the US needs to change. There are plenty of good reasons why community colleges in particular deserve greater investment. But the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) gets it wrong when they claim

There is a skills gap in our country, causing employers to have unfilled positions and too
many Americans unable to find family wage supporting jobs.

Wrong. Wrong. Wrong.  This is a zombie economic idea.  It’s enormously disappointing when leaders in higher education can’t even get the basic economic thinking straight.  First, let’s just apply some basic economic thinking to it.  Although there are good heterodox reasons for not thinking of the labor market is not an ordinary market (i.e. it’s institutional, not transaction-based), but let’s roll with the idea since so many purveyors of the “skills shortage” myth act like it is.  The implication is that there are multiple “job markets” and that many, perhaps, most are suffering a “shortage”.

So what’s a “job market”.  A simple definition would identify the nexus of potential workers and potential employers in a specific geographic region in a particular occupation.  For example, “welders in metro Chicago” or “CNC machine operators in SE Michigan” or “software developers in Houston” would be examples. Now if there’s a “shortage” in one of these job markets, it means there are fewer sellers (smaller quantity offered, to be technical) and more buyers demanding a larger quantity at the going market price.  Now what happens in both theory and practice when a market has a persistent shortage? Anybody? Yes, the price rises.  Price goes up to attract more sellers and discourage buyers.  And the price keeps going up until equilibrium between quantity offered for sale and quantity demanded become equal and eliminate the shortage. If there were shortages in job markets we should see wages going up!  We should see companies tripping over themselves to offer more and better benefits.  But we don’t see that do we? Wages are stagnant across the board.  That’s because there really isn’t any widespread “skills shortage”.

What we have is business owners and managers reporting a shortage of highly skilled workers who would be willing to work for below-equilibrium and falling wages.  Remember as a nation we’ve drastically cut back on public funding of education and over the last generation  companies have drastically cut their spending on training and apprenticeships.  Those businesses now expect a free-ride from others.  They want workers to pay for their own education and training without paying the wages needed to make that human capital investment worthwhile.  If there were truly a skills shortage, not only would we see rising wages but we’d also see rising college enrolments as the rising market wage encouraged students to invest.  But we don’t see either rising wages or rising enrolments.  In fact for the last couple (few?) years, enrolments have been declining.

I’m not the only one pointing out how bad this zombie “skills shortage” myth is.  Paul Krugman pointed out recently:

    …this new EPI report is a useful reminder of the extent to which another doctrine that sounds serious retains a grip on discourse — namely, the notion that we have big problems because our work force lacks essential skills.

This is very much a zombie doctrine — that is, a doctrine that should be dead by now, having been repeatedly refuted by evidence, but just keeps on shambling along. EPI presents some very interesting evidence from a survey of manufacturing, but they’re hardly the first to show that the data don’t at all support the skills-shortage hypothesis.

But it’s not just Paul Krugman and progressives saying that the “skills shortage” idea is bunk, its leading conservative economists too, like Ed Lazear in this 2012 paper.   Even the Boston Consulting Group, who we might expect to take push the “skills shortage” idea since business owners like to push the idea, seems constrained to follow the data and their data show that:

So what accounts for the high and lingering unemployment?  The Economic Policy Institute looked at the whole issue and surveyed the literature and research in this January EPI report.

There is a sizeable literature on whether a skills mismatch is a driver of today’s weak jobs recovery, and the strong consensus is that the weak labor market recovery is not due to skills mismatch (or any other structural factors). Instead, it is due to weakness in aggregate demand.

That’s it.  We have a shortage of aggregate demand. We have a shortage of customers who spend. We have a shortage of spending. We don’t have a shortage of skills.

Higher education leaders who position their plans based on the false premise of a skills shortage do themselves and their institutions a dis-service, so we may have a shortage of higher education leaders willing to do their own critical thinking and rely on research instead of parroting politically popular zombie ideas. I can understand the temptation of many higher education leaders to use push the idea because they think it will help them get funding. But that’s a losing strategy. By embracing such zombie ideas, they destroy their own credibility with the faculty, the very people they need to implement the changes they’re advocating.

Healthcare Comes to America – The ACA Is Working

Last night was the cutoff for signing up for health insurance on the new Affordable Care Act (“Obamacare”) healthcare exchanges.  Despite a very rocky start and despite an incredible blitz of lies and propaganda against it by opponents, the program has met its first year target. Charles Gaba at ACASignups tracks the numbers so we don’t have to:

…in spite of everything–the terrible website launch of HC.gov and some of the state sites; the still-terrible status of some of the state sites even now; the actively-hostile opposition and obstructive actions in certain states, the negative spin on every development by some in the news media–in spite of all of this, over 7 million people nationwide enrolled in private, ACA-compliant healthcare plans between 12:01am on 10/1/13 and 11:59pm on 3/31/14…slightly surpassing the original CBO projection for that period.

Of course, the deadline isn’t that final depending on where you live and whether you already started an application or you fall into other special categories.  Again, Gaba tells us:

the enrollment “extension period”, which is 15 days in most states, but which actually runs until April 30th in Oregon (without any “started by 3/31″ requirement that I can see) and even all the way out until May 30th in Nevada (with the “3/31 start” requirement). Only 3 states (CT, RI and WA) aren’t offering any extension period at all, and I’m not entirely sure about Rhode Island as their press release was a bit confusing. I also have no idea know what the status of Hawaii’s exchange is.

Of course the 2nd open enrollment period kicks off again this November, but there’s also the other types of enrollments which haven’t ended, even for the current year.

  • Medicaid has no cut-off date; if you qualify, you can enroll at any time.
  • The SHOP exchanges (small business) don’t have a cut-off date. Most of them still aren’t functional (only about 70,000 people are covered by SHOP policies so far nationally), but some are, and they’re year-round.
  • If you’re one of the 5.2 million Native Americans living within the U.S., there’s no cut-off for you either.
  • Finally, for the rest of us, you can still enroll in an exchange-based QHP if you have a major life event such as getting divorced, giving birth, losing your job and so on.

This is a very good start for the country and for the economy.  My own preference, documented elsewhere, was and still is for a single-payer system similar to Canada’s.  But this is significant start.