Changes

Well it’s been a long time since I was regularly blogging – and I want that to change.  My professional life has been changing, so, to that end I’m making some minor changes here to the blog, that I hope will help integrate blogging with how my professional life has changed.

First change you may notice is the tabs just under the banner.  Except for the About page (which needs to be updated soon), I’ve added four categories:  Economics, Higher Ed, Presentations, and Class Notes.  The main blog or home page gets all the posts, but I’m categorizing them according to purpose.  I’ll continue (resume?) making posts where I explain or comment on economics topics and these will obviously be also categorized under Economics.  But in keeping with how broadened activities in my college’s shared governance and strategic planning efforts, as well as my own professional interests in Malartu.org , I also intend to start making posts on ideas and issues facing higher education.  In particular I’m interested in innovation, issues, and technology as it affects professors.

Thirdly, I find I’m being asked to make more and more community and campus-wide presentations lately, so I’ve added a category where I can post those for convenience.  As I get more adept with lecture capture software, I’ll add videos.  Finally, there’s a category that’s plainly just for my and my students’ convenience.  It’s a place where I can post links that I intend to use in class.

If you’re interested in everything, then just keep coming to the home page.  But if you’re only interested in of these categories, feel free to frequent that tab or subscribe to the RSS feed for it.

And I also want to thank everybody for coming to visit.  Readership, largely through search since I haven’t been adding that much new stuff lately, has been very rewarding and encouraging. Thanks.

 

Intergenerational Transfers, Social Security, and Medicare

The presentation I’m making to some open classes on campus this week and to a community group in early May.  Bottom-line: When media pundits and politicians tell us that the older generation is “screwing” the younger generation, they’re lying.  There sound economic theoretical and empirical reasons for intergenerational transfer programs and social compacts like Social Security and Medicare.  And, there’s not factual reasons to say “Social Security and Medicare are going bankrupt”.  Quite the contrary, these programs will be there in the future when the younger generation retires and even when my as-yet-unborn grandchildren retire.  The only real threat to Social Security and Medicare comes from an overly-privileged 1% of the wealth and income distribution that frankly doesn’t understand how the programs work.