Response to Mike Caulfield Question

Mike Caulfield on Twitter asks a question today: https://twitter.com/holden/status/1071194090165886976 There's more to it. It's a whole thread.  Rather than respond in what would inevitably be a  long thread myself, I'll just post my reactions & poorly formed thoughts here. Disclaimer: I haven't read Simons in decade(s) and all economic "facts" I mention here are really … Continue reading Response to Mike Caulfield Question

Shelter in the Open

This is the second of my two reflections on last week's OpenEd18 conference. This one is personal. I'm stepping outside my normal economist persona and sharing my personal experience. Actually, it's less a reflection on the conference than reflection on what I learned about myself at the conference. Open conferences like OpenEd, OER, and OEGlobal … Continue reading Shelter in the Open

Reflection on OpenEd18: Becoming Open Education

Last week I participated in OpenEd18. This was my fourth OpenEd which, given the growth in the conference, makes me one of the "old hands" in the kind words of David Wiley.  This is the first of two reflections I'll post about the conference. In this one, I'll give some broad impressions of the topics … Continue reading Reflection on OpenEd18: Becoming Open Education

Big Ag, Big Food, and the Commons -revisited

Today I'm reprising a talk I did last year with Professor Elizabeth Robison's Sociology class.  We'll be discussing a brief history of agriculture and food production in the U.S. Key points are how the capital requirements, political dynamics, and technology developments have combined to make food production anything but the success story free market advocates … Continue reading Big Ag, Big Food, and the Commons -revisited

OER, Higher Ed, and the Commons

After spending the past year studying both the economics of a commons, as well as the history and evolution of higher education, it's long past time to say something about what I've figured out.  This is the first post along those lines and I hope it's not the last. What follows here is a light … Continue reading OER, Higher Ed, and the Commons

Debt: Good, Bad, Ugly, and Not-Really

Debt is often considered something bad in our society. At the beginning of any semester in the macroeconomics principles I'll have many students identify debt - either the "national debt" or student loan debt or even just household debt - as a leading macroeconomic challenge facing the nation. The reason is because debt is an … Continue reading Debt: Good, Bad, Ugly, and Not-Really

Road to a Commons of Our Own: Background

Note this is most of the abstract for today's presentation at OER18 in Bristol, UK entitled "Commons of Our Own".  I've embedded the slides for the presentation at the end. Disclaimer:  This is the advance abstract written months before I created the slides.  We'll see what I actually say today.  I'm kind of curious about … Continue reading Road to a Commons of Our Own: Background

How Federal Budget Policy Affects Generations

Today I'm giving a public talk to and for the Michigan Intergenerational Network. I'll be discussing how government budget policies and priorities are affecting the generations. This is a topic worthy of an entire college course or even a MOOC, but unfortunately I've only got a couple hours at most.  This post isn't a full … Continue reading How Federal Budget Policy Affects Generations

OER, CARE, Stewardship, and the Commons

  Lisa Petrides, Douglas Levin, and C. Edward Watson recently released the CARE Framework, but apparently some people, David Wiley in particular, don't care for the framework.  Stephen Downes has already I think responded in two brief posts here and here. Stephen's posts are brief and I think pretty spot-on. Nonetheless, I'll soldier on and try to … Continue reading OER, CARE, Stewardship, and the Commons