On the Bin Laden Death

So the government claims to have finally, after 9 1/2 years, to have found and killed Osama bin Laden.  So they found bin Laden.  I don’t suppose they found our right to habeas corpus, the 4th Amendment to the Constitution, the right to keep your shoes on in an airport, or any of the other many things we’ve lost during those years.  I wonder how long it will take to find those rights again.

Corporations Not Entitled to Privacy

The Supreme Court of the U.S. has finally put a limit on the “person-ness” of a corporation.  Apparently a corporation still has unlimited free speech rights since it is “person” according to the court, but it doesn’t yet have a right to privacy.  Volokh Conspiracy explains:

Yesterday, in FCC v. AT&T, the Supreme Court unanimously rejected AT&T’s claim that records related to an FCC investigation of AT&T should be exempt from disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act because such disclosure would violate AT&T’s “personal privacy.” Specifically, AT&T sought to invoke the FOIA exemption for law enforcement records the disclosure of which “could reasonably be expected to constitute an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy.”

Key to AT&T’s argument was that if a corporation is a legal “person,” then it should have personal privacy rights. The Supreme Court did not buy it. The opinion by Chief Justice Roberts is short and sweet. It concludes:

We reject the argument that because “person” is defined for purposes of FOIA to include a corporation, the phrase “personal privacy” in Exemption 7(C) reaches corporations as well. The protection in FOIA against disclosure of law enforcement information on the ground that it would constitute an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy does not extend to corporations. We trust that AT&T will not take it personally.